EN
28 March 2018
Billy Raymont to Make World Cup Final Debut With Australian Warmblood Oaks Redwood
Billy Raymont is currently on what could be described as a grand tour of the world. The Australian born and based show jumper has hit several career milestones in the last few months, and is looking ahead to his biggest one yet, in a few weeks time in Paris, France. With an active yard in Queensland, Australia, where he brings along 15-20 horses at a time, teaches and competes, 38-year-old Raymont has, in the past, taken horses across to the USA or Europe for short trips. Last summer, he was paired with a horse that has changed everything, the Australian-bred Oaks Redwood, a 13-year-old warmblood by ASB Conquistador x Verdi owned by the Tucker family. Known as "Basil", he was sent to Raymont to compete, and together the two won a string of World Cup Qualifiers in the Australian League last fall. That put Raymont at the top of the Australian League rankings, and raised his sights as to what could be next. “To be honest, a short conversation with [fellow Australian rider] Jamie Kermond a couple of months before the end of our World Cup Series initiated all this,” Raymont says. “He asked if I was interested in going to the World Cup Final, and that we should maybe plan on going there and work on doing things together.” Australia’s chef d’equipe, Todd Hinde, had already been planning a schedule for Jamie that included the Longines Masters of Hong Kong CSI5*, and Raymont suddenly found himself on the entry list. “I didn’t quite understand what it was like getting into these five star shows, but it ended up that Hong Kong was my first five star show, which was quite crazy,” Raymont said. “It’s been really good to be able to go along with Jamie and Todd. They’ve organized so much, and made it stress free for me.” At Hong Kong in February, Raymont and Oaks Redwood jumped three clear rounds amid the big atmosphere of the glittering indoor competition. “Being around riders who we’ve mostly only watched on TV is a bit crazy, but I felt comfortable enough,” Raymont says. “I had a plan when I went to the Hong Kong Masters that I would just do the medium tour and small classes. My horse went so well the first two days that I was keen to start in the Grand Prix on Sunday, but I decided to stick to my plan. The experience gave me a lot of confidence that my horse was good for it, and that I was too.” With that experience under their belt, Raymont and Oaks Redwood flew onward to Europe, where they are based with Yves Houtacker in Holland, and jumped Peelbergen and Braunschweig. But Raymont wanted one more good indoor experience before April’s World Cup Final. With the indoors season winding down and few opportunities left, Raymont and Hinde called the prestigious Saut Hermés CSI5*, and were granted an entry. Suddenly, Raymont was staring down his first international grand prix under the glass-ceilinged Grand Palais over a notoriously challenging 1.60m track in the tight confines of the grandest of indoors. “Last year, with all of our Australian World Cups being certificates of qualifications for the WEG, they were all pretty full standard, but I was sure a 1.60m grand prix in Europe would be different,” Raymont explains. “We don’t even dream of seeing a 1.60m track indoors in Australia. But it wasn’t hugely different. My horse handled it really well, and I needed that class to really be ready going to the World Cup Final.” In their first international grand prix start, Raymont and Oaks Redwood put in a solid performance at Saut Hermés, with just one fence down. In less than three week’s time, they will return to Paris for the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final. “It’s a bit of a new level for Australian breeding, to have a couple of horses at this level, going to Europe and doing this sort of thing,” Raymont mentions. “It’s nice to give people at home that confidence that our horses are coming over and doing this.” Oaks Redwood has certainly proven his mettle to compete at the very top level in the world, and will have his biggest chance yet at the Final. For now Raymont is focused on a good performance in April, but he’s also found himself penciled in for another big entry—the long list for Team Australia at September’s World Equestrian Games. Raymont will take it step by step, with a bit of optimism that the world’s biggest stage still awaits.
28 March 2018
Billy Raymont to Make World Cup Final Debut With Australian Warmblood Oaks Redwood
Billy Raymont is currently on what could be described as a grand tour of the world. The Australian born and based show jumper has hit several career milestones in the last few months, and is looking ahead to his biggest one yet, in a few weeks time in Paris, France. With an active yard in Queensland, Australia, where he brings along 15-20 horses at a time, teaches and competes, 38-year-old Raymont has, in the past, taken horses across to the USA or Europe for short trips. Last summer, he was paired with a horse that has changed everything, the Australian-bred Oaks Redwood, a 13-year-old warmblood by ASB Conquistador x Verdi owned by the Tucker family. Known as "Basil", he was sent to Raymont to compete, and together the two won a string of World Cup Qualifiers in the Australian League last fall. That put Raymont at the top of the Australian League rankings, and raised his sights as to what could be next. “To be honest, a short conversation with [fellow Australian rider] Jamie Kermond a couple of months before the end of our World Cup Series initiated all this,” Raymont says. “He asked if I was interested in going to the World Cup Final, and that we should maybe plan on going there and work on doing things together.” Australia’s chef d’equipe, Todd Hinde, had already been planning a schedule for Jamie that included the Longines Masters of Hong Kong CSI5*, and Raymont suddenly found himself on the entry list. “I didn’t quite understand what it was like getting into these five star shows, but it ended up that Hong Kong was my first five star show, which was quite crazy,” Raymont said. “It’s been really good to be able to go along with Jamie and Todd. They’ve organized so much, and made it stress free for me.” At Hong Kong in February, Raymont and Oaks Redwood jumped three clear rounds amid the big atmosphere of the glittering indoor competition. “Being around riders who we’ve mostly only watched on TV is a bit crazy, but I felt comfortable enough,” Raymont says. “I had a plan when I went to the Hong Kong Masters that I would just do the medium tour and small classes. My horse went so well the first two days that I was keen to start in the Grand Prix on Sunday, but I decided to stick to my plan. The experience gave me a lot of confidence that my horse was good for it, and that I was too.” With that experience under their belt, Raymont and Oaks Redwood flew onward to Europe, where they are based with Yves Houtacker in Holland, and jumped Peelbergen and Braunschweig. But Raymont wanted one more good indoor experience before April’s World Cup Final. With the indoors season winding down and few opportunities left, Raymont and Hinde called the prestigious Saut Hermés CSI5*, and were granted an entry. Suddenly, Raymont was staring down his first international grand prix under the glass-ceilinged Grand Palais over a notoriously challenging 1.60m track in the tight confines of the grandest of indoors. “Last year, with all of our Australian World Cups being certificates of qualifications for the WEG, they were all pretty full standard, but I was sure a 1.60m grand prix in Europe would be different,” Raymont explains. “We don’t even dream of seeing a 1.60m track indoors in Australia. But it wasn’t hugely different. My horse handled it really well, and I needed that class to really be ready going to the World Cup Final.” In their first international grand prix start, Raymont and Oaks Redwood put in a solid performance at Saut Hermés, with just one fence down. In less than three week’s time, they will return to Paris for the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping Final. “It’s a bit of a new level for Australian breeding, to have a couple of horses at this level, going to Europe and doing this sort of thing,” Raymont mentions. “It’s nice to give people at home that confidence that our horses are coming over and doing this.” Oaks Redwood has certainly proven his mettle to compete at the very top level in the world, and will have his biggest chance yet at the Final. For now Raymont is focused on a good performance in April, but he’s also found himself penciled in for another big entry—the long list for Team Australia at September’s World Equestrian Games. Raymont will take it step by step, with a bit of optimism that the world’s biggest stage still awaits.
25 March 2018
Big Money for Madden in Winning Florida Weekend
Last year, after the retirement of her World Cup Final winner Simon, Beezie Madden set out to rebuild her string of top horses. “We retired Simon last year and Cortes the year before that, so there was a big hole in my string for a bit. We made a big push starting in the fall of 2016 to make some big purchases and so far it’s been successful.” Successful is an understatement: after this weekend’s success, there is no doubt that her stable is one of the strongest in the USA. The 55-year-old Olympic veteran earned a total of $417,650 in prize money over two days of competition in Florida, by winning two major grands prix with two different horses that can now be counted as her two top mounts. She has been bringing both horses along up the levels for several years. On Saturday riding Breitling LS, she won the $205,000 CaptiveOne Grand Prix CSI4* in Wellington, earning first place prize money of $67,650. And on Sunday, March 25, Madden and many other Wellington-based riders traveled three and a half hours to the north, to HITS Ocala, in order to compete in the annual Great American $1 Million Grand Prix.The nationally-rated competition offers the biggest single-class prize money in the United States, along with corresponding $1 Million grand prix classes at HITS Coachella in California and HITS Saugerties in New York. Madden, who already won a $1 Million grand prix in 2015, jumped to the top of Sunday’s class riding Coach, a 10-year-old Holsteiner gelding by Con Air x Corofino I. Both Coach and Breitling LS are owned by Madden’s longtime supporter, Abigail Wexner. Five horses jumped off in the class that earned the fifth-place rider a healthy $75,000. Prize money paid out to 20th place. “This is a horse with a lot of scope and he has really nice ride-ability,” Madden said about Coach. “He’s German bred, but we bought him in Holland. We’ve had him since he was 7 years old and he’s been a pleasure to have the whole time.” American riders placed in the top three of the class, with young Lillie Keenan riding the 2nd place aboard Super Sox, and Charlie Jayne claiming 3rd place with former broodmare Tou La Moon.
25 March 2018
Big Money for Madden in Winning Florida Weekend
Last year, after the retirement of her World Cup Final winner Simon, Beezie Madden set out to rebuild her string of top horses. “We retired Simon last year and Cortes the year before that, so there was a big hole in my string for a bit. We made a big push starting in the fall of 2016 to make some big purchases and so far it’s been successful.” Successful is an understatement: after this weekend’s success, there is no doubt that her stable is one of the strongest in the USA. The 55-year-old Olympic veteran earned a total of $417,650 in prize money over two days of competition in Florida, by winning two major grands prix with two different horses that can now be counted as her two top mounts. She has been bringing both horses along up the levels for several years. On Saturday riding Breitling LS, she won the $205,000 CaptiveOne Grand Prix CSI4* in Wellington, earning first place prize money of $67,650. And on Sunday, March 25, Madden and many other Wellington-based riders traveled three and a half hours to the north, to HITS Ocala, in order to compete in the annual Great American $1 Million Grand Prix.The nationally-rated competition offers the biggest single-class prize money in the United States, along with corresponding $1 Million grand prix classes at HITS Coachella in California and HITS Saugerties in New York. Madden, who already won a $1 Million grand prix in 2015, jumped to the top of Sunday’s class riding Coach, a 10-year-old Holsteiner gelding by Con Air x Corofino I. Both Coach and Breitling LS are owned by Madden’s longtime supporter, Abigail Wexner. Five horses jumped off in the class that earned the fifth-place rider a healthy $75,000. Prize money paid out to 20th place. “This is a horse with a lot of scope and he has really nice ride-ability,” Madden said about Coach. “He’s German bred, but we bought him in Holland. We’ve had him since he was 7 years old and he’s been a pleasure to have the whole time.” American riders placed in the top three of the class, with young Lillie Keenan riding the 2nd place aboard Super Sox, and Charlie Jayne claiming 3rd place with former broodmare Tou La Moon.
24 March 2018
Beezie Madden and Breitling LS Win CSI4* Grand Prix at WEF
With five in the jumpoff and five clear rounds that got better and better, it was the final rider in the order, the USA’s Beezie Madden, who was fastest to win the $205,000 CaptiveOne Grand Prix CSI4* with Breitling LS on Saturday, March 24, 2018. It was the biggest class during the second-to-last week of competition at the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, FL, USA, and run in the morning on WEF’s grass derby field, to give the 1.50m Series Championship Final center stage later in the evening under Saturday Night Lights. Breitling LS, the 12-year-old SLS stallion by Quintero Ask x Acord II, has already been a winner once before this season in Wellington, and Madden chose today’s grand prix as his final preparation before he competes in Paris, France in April at the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Final. “I think that the grass and a nice fresh venue keeps him going better. He’s always a better horse when he’s in a good mood and this venue keeps him happy,” Madden commented. The jumpoff got quite exciting, as all of the five finishers, who moved on to the shorter round from the original order of 45, jumped stellar clear rounds. Madden had the advantage of going last in the first round, and last in the jumpoff, allowing her to catch the very quick round of Ireland’s Daniel Coyle, who rode Cita to 2nd place. While Coyle would have liked to win it, he expressed happiness with his result of the day. “The mare is jumping fantastic and has never been in better form,” he said. “She will do next week and then have a couple of months off. Later in the summer we’ll do the Nations Cup in Langley and probably spruce meadows again and see how it goes from there.” Richie Moloney, also of Ireland, placed 3rd with Freestyle De Muze. Juan Manuel Gallego and Fee Des Sequoias Z were 4th for Colombia, and Alise Oken of the USA placed 5th with Hitchcock VD Broekkant.
24 March 2018
Beezie Madden and Breitling LS Win CSI4* Grand Prix at WEF
With five in the jumpoff and five clear rounds that got better and better, it was the final rider in the order, the USA’s Beezie Madden, who was fastest to win the $205,000 CaptiveOne Grand Prix CSI4* with Breitling LS on Saturday, March 24, 2018. It was the biggest class during the second-to-last week of competition at the Winter Equestrian Festival in Wellington, FL, USA, and run in the morning on WEF’s grass derby field, to give the 1.50m Series Championship Final center stage later in the evening under Saturday Night Lights. Breitling LS, the 12-year-old SLS stallion by Quintero Ask x Acord II, has already been a winner once before this season in Wellington, and Madden chose today’s grand prix as his final preparation before he competes in Paris, France in April at the 2018 Longines FEI World Cup Final. “I think that the grass and a nice fresh venue keeps him going better. He’s always a better horse when he’s in a good mood and this venue keeps him happy,” Madden commented. The jumpoff got quite exciting, as all of the five finishers, who moved on to the shorter round from the original order of 45, jumped stellar clear rounds. Madden had the advantage of going last in the first round, and last in the jumpoff, allowing her to catch the very quick round of Ireland’s Daniel Coyle, who rode Cita to 2nd place. While Coyle would have liked to win it, he expressed happiness with his result of the day. “The mare is jumping fantastic and has never been in better form,” he said. “She will do next week and then have a couple of months off. Later in the summer we’ll do the Nations Cup in Langley and probably spruce meadows again and see how it goes from there.” Richie Moloney, also of Ireland, placed 3rd with Freestyle De Muze. Juan Manuel Gallego and Fee Des Sequoias Z were 4th for Colombia, and Alise Oken of the USA placed 5th with Hitchcock VD Broekkant.